Proceedings of 1st Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme Scientific conference (Accra, 2017)

Oral presentation

Intimate partner violence during pregnancy and associated factors among women attending antenatal care in Kabale Regional Referral Hospital, Uganda, 2016

Cite this: Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. Oct 2017; 3(3): 13. doi:10.11604/pamj.cp.2017.3.13.103

Submitted: 04 Oct 17   Accepted: 04 Oct 17   Published: 16 Oct 17

Key words: Intimate partner violence, male partner, pregnancy, women

© Wilson Tusiime et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.proceedings.panafrican-med-journal.com/conferences/2017/3/13/abstract

Corresponding author: Wilson Tusiime, Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda (wtusiime@musph.ac.ug)

This abstract is published as part of the proceedings of 1st Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme Scientific conference (GHANA, )

Intimate partner violence during pregnancy and associated factors among women attending antenatal care in Kabale Regional Referral Hospital, Uganda, 2016

Wilson Tusiime1,&, Richard Mangwi Ayiasi1, Eric Segujja1

 

1Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda

 

 

&Corresponding author
Wilson Tusiime, Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda

 

 

Abstract

Introduction: intimate Partner Violence (IPV) was considered as actual physical and or sexual violence during the current pregnancy. IPV is globally widespread; with 35% of women reported to have some form of IPV in their life time. IPV during pregnancy endangers both the mother and unborn baby and it is associated with increased risk of HIV infection, foetal death, and premature rupture of the membrane. With the paucity of data in the developing countries, this study sought to determine the prevalence of IPV, the associated factors, and explore the coping strategies women employ.

 

Methods: we used a facility-based cross sectional study design to study pregnant women aged between 15 and 49 years attending antenatal care at Kabale hospital in (time??). A sample size of 211 pregnant women were enrolled in the study using systematic random sampling. 12 women were also purposively selected for in-depth interviews. The prevalence of IPV was analyzed descriptively to obtain frequencies and percentages. The factors associated were analyzed at bivariate level, followed by multivariable analyses, and factors were considered significant at p < 0.05. Data from the in-depth interviews was transcribed, coded and themes identified through manual analysis.

 

Results: women who never used alcohol before sex (AOR 0.02; 95% CI 0.003, 0.16), and women whose husbands never insisted on sex (AOR 0.06; 95% CI 0.02, 0.2) were less likely to be abused. Conversely, women who had ever been abused in their relationship (AOR 13.3; 95% CI 3.76, 47.09), and women with younger male partners were (AOR 5.7; 95% CI 0.89, 36.9) were more likely to be abused. Qualitatively reported factors associated with IPV were alcohol abuse, suspicion around infidelity, HIV infection and discordance, peer pressure, and duration of the pregnancy. The coping strategies used were seeking help, employment, running away, separation, feigning sickness, silence, separation, and tolerance.

 

Conclusion: the factors associated with IPV require a change in the mindset of men and the entire society in order to instill respect for women. There is need for male involvement and implementation of the existing laws.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1st Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme Scientific conference (Accra)

Country: GHANA

Dates: 18 Sep 17 - 21 Sep 17

Venue: Swiss Spirit and Suites Alisa Hotels

Organizers: Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme

Secretariat: gfeltp@gmail.com

Contact person: Dr. Ernest Kenu (ernest_kenu@yahoo.com)