Proceedings of 1st Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme Scientific conference (Accra, 2017)

Oral presentation

Cite this: Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. Oct 2017; 3(3): 36. doi:10.11604/pamj.cp.2017.3.36.150

Submitted: 06 Oct 17   Accepted: 09 Oct 17   Published: 17 Oct 17

Key words:

© Isaac Nkrumah et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.proceedings.panafrican-med-journal.com/conferences/2017/3/36/abstract

Corresponding author: Isaac Nkrumah, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana (sakrum22@yahoo.com)

This abstract is published as part of the proceedings of 1st Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme Scientific conference (GHANA, )

Prescribers’ compliance with quinine use for treating uncomplicated malaria in the first trimester of pregnancy in polyclinics in Accra

Isaac Nkrumah1,&, Ivy Asantewa Sarpong1

 

1School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana

 

 

&Corresponding author
Isaac Nkrumah, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana

 

 

Abstract

Introduction: malaria is a public health problem affecting vulnerable populations in sub-Saharan Africa. The recommended regimen for treating uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the first trimester of pregnancy is 10 mg/kg body weight of oral Quinine given three times daily for 7 days or 10 mg/kg body weight of Quinine plus clindamycin to be taken orally 3 times daily for 3 days. However, little is known about the proportion of prescribers who comply with this guideline in health facilities in Ghana. This study sought to find out whether prescribers in polyclinics in the Accra Metropolis comply with the use of Quinine in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the first trimester of pregnancy and also assess factors that influence prescriber’s compliance with the Standard Treatment Guidelines (STG).

 

Methods: a descriptive cross-sectional study approach involving the use of a structured questionnaire to collect data from 75 prescribers at polyclinics in Accra. Bivariate analysis was used to show associations between independent variables and compliance with Quinine prescription. Factors predictive of Quinine compliance were determined by multivariate analysis.

 

Results: the results showed low level of prescriber compliance with regards to the treatment guidelines i.e. 17/75 (22.7%) prescribers treated pregnant women in their first trimester with Quinine or Quinine plus Clindamycin. Treatment frequently prescribed was Artemether-lumefantrine 46/75 (61.3%), Artesunate-amodiaquine 12/75 (16.0%) and Quinine 17/75 (22.7%). Prescriber’s age, educational status and duration of practice did not influence compliance with Quinine prescription. However, the availability of the guideline (p = 0.025) and side effects of Quinine (p = 0.017) influenced prescribers compliance.

 

Conclusion: low level of compliance with regards to Quinine prescription may have serious clinical implications as pregnant women in their first trimester who have malaria may not be receiving the right treatment. Furthermore, because the ACTs have not widely been tested for safety due to limited data means that pregnant women and their fetuses are probably being put in harm’s way. This therefore calls for intensified effort to educate prescribers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1st Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme Scientific conference (Accra)

Country: GHANA

Dates: 18 Sep 17 - 21 Sep 17

Venue: Swiss Spirit and Suites Alisa Hotels

Organizers: Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme

Secretariat: gfeltp@gmail.com

Contact person: Dr. Ernest Kenu (ernest_kenu@yahoo.com)