Proceedings of Nigeria Centre for Disease Control/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2nd Annual Scientific Conference (Abuja, 2018)

Opening ceremony

Seroprevalence of rubella-specific antibodies and factors associated with its transmission among children aged 0-10 years, in Jos, Nigeria, 2016

Cite this: Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. Mar 2018; 8(8): 13. doi:10.11604/pamj.cp.2018.8.13.685

Submitted: 22 Jan 18   Accepted: 24 Jan 18   Published: 21 Mar 18

Key words: Children, ELISA, Jos, sero-positivity, rubella

© Hyelshilni Samuel Waziri et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.proceedings.panafrican-med-journal.com/conferences/2018/8/13/abstract

Corresponding author: Hyelshilni Samuel Waziri, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria (hyelshilni@yahoo.com)

This abstract is published as part of the proceedings of Nigeria Centre for Disease Control/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2nd Annual Scientific Conference(NIGERIA, )

Seroprevalence of rubella-specific antibodies and factors associated with its transmission among children aged 0-10 years, in Jos, Nigeria, 2016

Hyelshilni Samuel Waziri1,&, Fatima Giwa2, Adebola Olayinka1, Muhammad Balogun1, Ndadilnasiya Waziri1, Patrick Nguku1

 

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Abuja, Nigeria, 2Department of Medical Microbiology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria

 

 

&Corresponding author
Hyelshilni Samuel Waziri, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria

 

 

Abstract

Introduction: rubella infection during early pregnancy may result in congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), stillbirth or miscarriage. Children often are the source of infection to their mothers. Routine rubella vaccination is yet to be introduced in Nigeria. We determined the sero-prevalence of rubella-specific antibodies in school children 0-10 years and factors associated with its transmission in Jos.

 

Methods: we conducted a cross-sectional study. We recruited children aged 0-10 years from five and 17 schools in Jos North and Jos South Local Government Areas (LGAs) respectively using a modified cluster sampling. Blood sample was collected from each child and analyzed for rubella IgG and IgM using ELISA. We administered a structured questionnaire to obtain socio-demographic and risk factors information from the participants. We conducted univariate, bivariate and multivariate analysis to determine proportions and significant factors at 95% confidence interval.

 

Results: a total of 405 children were studied with a mean age of 6.3 years (SD 2.5), and 220 (54.3%) were females. Rubella IgG was positive in 336 (83.0%) of children while only 9 (2.2%) children were positive for IgM. None of the children had ever received rubella vaccine. On bivariate analysis, age ≥ 5 years, [OR (CI) 1.8 (1.0-3.1)], lack of western education, [OR (CI) 2.3 (1.2 - 4.3)] and residence in Jos North [OR (CI) 10.4 (3.2-33.9)] were significantly associated with rubella sero-positivity. On multivariate analysis, only residence in Jos North was significantly associated with rubella seropositivity. OR (CI) 10.4 (2.4 - 43.9).

 

Conclusion: a large proportion of children were still susceptible to rubella virus infection. Children above five years, lack of western education and living in Jos North LGA were risk factors for rubella sero-positivity. Parents were enlightened on dangers of CRS and the need for rubella vaccine. The result of the study was shared with Plateau State to encourage fast tracking of introduction or rubella vaccination in Nigeria.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nigeria CDC/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2<sup>nd</sup> Annual Scientific Conference (Abuja)

To create a platform for epidemiologists and public health physicians to share their scientific works, NCDC/NFELTP organized the 2nd annual scientific conference with the theme "strengthening one health through field epidemiology training" at Transcorp Hilton Hotel, Abuja, Nigeria from July 5-7, 2017. The objectives of the conference were to provide residents and graduates a forum to share findings from their field activities; provide training opportunity for trainees on scientific communication; provide an opportunity for epidemiological networking as well as create a forum to discuss pertinent public health issues. In attendance were dignitaries from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USAID, WHO, Africa CDC, Ministries Departments and Agencies, University officials and other implementing partners. With the current rise in zoonotic diseases, the conference also featured a two-day pre-conference workshop on One Health which prioritized zoonotic infectious diseases in Nigeria using standardized prioritization methods. A second workshop focused on antimicrobial resistance. There were 38 oral presentations, 60 poster presentations and 2 plenary sessions. The presentations covered various sub-themes ranging from outbreak investigations, case management, health system strengthening, vaccine preventable diseases, communicable diseases and surveillance. The conference featured a National Night and climaxed with awards to outstanding presenters.

Country: NIGERIA

Dates: 05 Jul 17 - 07 Jul 17

Venue: Transcorp Hilton Hotel

Organizers: Nigeria Centre for Disease Control / Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme

Secretariat: gchinyere@afenet.net

Contact person: Dr Patrick Nguku (pnguku@afenet.net)