Proceedings of Nigeria Centre for Disease Control/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2nd Annual Scientific Conference (Abuja, 2018)

Opening ceremony

Knowledge of women of child bearing age on long lasting insecticidal nets and barriers to ownership and utilization, Igabi Local Government Area, Kaduna State, Nigeria

Cite this: Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. Mar 2018; 8(8): 24. doi:10.11604/pamj.cp.2018.8.24.606

Submitted: 15 Jan 18   Accepted: 30 Jan 18   Published: 28 Mar 18

Key words: Malaria, women in child bearing age, long lasting insecticidal nets, LLIN ownership and utilization

© Obafemi Joseph Babalola et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.proceedings.panafrican-med-journal.com/conferences/2018/8/24/abstract

Corresponding author: Obafemi Joseph Babalola, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria (drfemibabs@yahoo.com)

This abstract is published as part of the proceedings of Nigeria Centre for Disease Control/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2nd Annual Scientific Conference(NIGERIA, )

Knowledge of women of child bearing age on long lasting insecticidal nets and barriers to ownership and utilization, Igabi Local Government Area, Kaduna State, Nigeria

Obafemi Joseph Babalola1,&, Mohammed Sambo2, Olufemi Ajumobi3, Ikeoluwapo Ajayi4, Saheed Gidado3, Patrick Nguku1

 

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Abuja, Nigeria, 2Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria, 3African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET), Nigeria, 4Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

 

 

&Corresponding author
Obafemi Joseph Babalola, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria

 

 

Abstract

Introduction: malaria remains a global threat, its effect on children and pregnant women was devastating. Nigeria bears 25% of malaria burden in Africa, but amenable to Long Lasting Insecticidal Nets (LLIN) utilization. Despite knowledge of malaria, gap exists between LLIN ownership and utilization. We assessed WCBAs knowledge of LLIN, barriers to ownership and utilization.

 

Methods: a cross-sectional study. Using a multistage sampling, 630 WCBA (15 to 49 years) in Igabi LGA, Kaduna State Nigeria were interviewed by trained female health workers, with a pretested semi-structured questionnaire adapted from malaria indicator survey on socio-demographic characteristics, LLIN knowledge, ownership, and utilization barriers. Knowledge was categorized into good, average and poor. Frequency, proportions, chi square, odd ratio and multivariate regression were calculated using Epi Info 7.

 

Results: median age was 29 years (IQR 40) and 22.0% currently pregnant. No formal education, 40.5% and 47.7% at rural residence. LLIN awareness was 96.0%, 28.8% had good knowledge, but ownership and utilization was 79% and 66.5% respectively. Among 132 WCBA without LLIN, ownership barriers were where to get LLIN (40.2), dislike its use (56.8%), and use other malaria preventive measures (34.8%). Barriers in 174 WCBA with unused LLIN were diversion to alternate uses (78.7%), heat and discomfort (21.8%), perceptions of low mosquito density (7.5%) and been bitten by mosquito while sleeping under LLIN (12.6%). Formal education (aOR 1.9; 95% Confidence Interval (C.I); (1.3 - 3.0) predict good knowledge but awareness was 0.2 times less likely (95% (C.I); (0.1 - 0.4) to predict utilization but knowledge of malaria transmission (aOR 1.9, 95% C.I (1.1 - 3.2). Rural residence predicts LLIN ownership (aOR 3.6, 95% C.I (2.3 - 5.8) and utilization (aOR 3.1, 95% C.I (2.1 - 4.6).

 

Conclusion: poor knowledge of LLIN, barriers to ownership and utilization exists among WCBA. Efforts that educate WCBA on malaria and LLIN utilization with other malaria preventive measures is recommended.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nigeria CDC/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2<sup>nd</sup> Annual Scientific Conference (Abuja)

To create a platform for epidemiologists and public health physicians to share their scientific works, NCDC/NFELTP organized the 2nd annual scientific conference with the theme "strengthening one health through field epidemiology training" at Transcorp Hilton Hotel, Abuja, Nigeria from July 5-7, 2017. The objectives of the conference were to provide residents and graduates a forum to share findings from their field activities; provide training opportunity for trainees on scientific communication; provide an opportunity for epidemiological networking as well as create a forum to discuss pertinent public health issues. In attendance were dignitaries from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USAID, WHO, Africa CDC, Ministries Departments and Agencies, University officials and other implementing partners. With the current rise in zoonotic diseases, the conference also featured a two-day pre-conference workshop on One Health which prioritized zoonotic infectious diseases in Nigeria using standardized prioritization methods. A second workshop focused on antimicrobial resistance. There were 38 oral presentations, 60 poster presentations and 2 plenary sessions. The presentations covered various sub-themes ranging from outbreak investigations, case management, health system strengthening, vaccine preventable diseases, communicable diseases and surveillance. The conference featured a National Night and climaxed with awards to outstanding presenters.

Country: NIGERIA

Dates: 05 Jul 17 - 07 Jul 17

Venue: Transcorp Hilton Hotel

Organizers: Nigeria Centre for Disease Control / Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme

Secretariat: gchinyere@afenet.net

Contact person: Dr Patrick Nguku (pnguku@afenet.net)