Proceedings of Nigeria Centre for Disease Control/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2nd Annual Scientific Conference (Abuja, 2018)

Opening ceremony

Prevalence of modifiable risk factors for hypertension among secondary school adolescents, Abuja, Nigeria, 2016

Cite this: Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. Mar 2018; 8(8): 26. doi:10.11604/pamj.cp.2018.8.26.608

Submitted: 15 Jan 18   Accepted: 29 Jan 18   Published: 28 Mar 18

Key words: Hypertension, modifiable risk factors, adolescents, secondary school, Nigeria

© Ijeoma Gladys Leo-Nnadi et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.proceedings.panafrican-med-journal.com/conferences/2018/8/26/abstract

Corresponding author: Ijeoma Gladys Leo-Nnadi, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria (ijeomagladys20@yahoo.com)

This abstract is published as part of the proceedings of Nigeria Centre for Disease Control/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2nd Annual Scientific Conference(NIGERIA, )

Prevalence of modifiable risk factors for hypertension among secondary school adolescents, Abuja, Nigeria, 2016

Ijeoma Gladys Leo-Nnadi1,&, Adamu Shehu2, Mohammed Nasir Sambo2, Saheed Gidado3, Abisola Oladimeji1, Patrick Nguku1

 

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Abuja, Nigeria, 2Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria, 3African Field Epidemiology Network, Nigeria

 

 

&Corresponding author
Ijeoma Gladys Leo-Nnadi, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria

 

 

Abstract

Introduction: globally, hypertension is one of the prominent non-communicable diseases and its increased prevalence had been noted in adolescents. Modifiable risk factors such as obesity, unhealthy diet, and physical inactivity have consistently been implicated in adolescents’ hypertension. This study assessed the prevalence of modifiable risk factors of hypertension among secondary school adolescents, Abuja, Nigeria.

 

Methods: using multistage sampling technique, 782 adolescents were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaires were used to obtain information on the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants. Adapted physical activity questionnaires for children and 24 hour dietary recall were used to determine their physical activity levels and dietary habits respectively. Anthropometric measures, blood pressure, and biochemical parameters were recorded to assess presence of modifiable risk factors. Frequencies, means, proportions, and standard deviations were calculated. Associations between variables were determined using odds ratios at 95% confidence interval and chi square at p-value of less than 0.05.

 

Results: the mean age of the 782 participants was 14.3 ± 2.5years; 428 (55.7%) were females, 394 (50.4%) in rural, 425 (54.4%) in private schools. Overall, 187 (24%) and 33 (4%) were pre-hypertensive and hypertensive respectively; 65 (8.3%) were overweight and 152 (19.4%), obese. Twenty-four subjects (3.1%) had history of smoking, 261 (33.1%) had ever drank alcohol, 512 (65.5%) were physically inactive and 626 (80.1%) had poor dietary habits. Logistic regression showed that the significant predictors of adolescents’ likelihood of being hypertensive were overweight and obesity (AOR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.5 - 4.0), poor dietary habit (AOR: 4.3, 95% CI: 2.2 - 8.6), attending private (AOR: 0.001, 95% CI: 0.001 - 0.01) and urban (AOR: 0.2, 95% C1:0.1 - 0.4) schools.

 

Conclusion: the prevalence of modifiable risk factors especially pre-hypertension, overweight and obesity among Abuja adolescents were high. We are currently engaging the government and educational institutions to intensify health education focusing on lifestyle modifications, to reduce the future complications due to hypertension.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nigeria CDC/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2<sup>nd</sup> Annual Scientific Conference (Abuja)

To create a platform for epidemiologists and public health physicians to share their scientific works, NCDC/NFELTP organized the 2nd annual scientific conference with the theme "strengthening one health through field epidemiology training" at Transcorp Hilton Hotel, Abuja, Nigeria from July 5-7, 2017. The objectives of the conference were to provide residents and graduates a forum to share findings from their field activities; provide training opportunity for trainees on scientific communication; provide an opportunity for epidemiological networking as well as create a forum to discuss pertinent public health issues. In attendance were dignitaries from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USAID, WHO, Africa CDC, Ministries Departments and Agencies, University officials and other implementing partners. With the current rise in zoonotic diseases, the conference also featured a two-day pre-conference workshop on One Health which prioritized zoonotic infectious diseases in Nigeria using standardized prioritization methods. A second workshop focused on antimicrobial resistance. There were 38 oral presentations, 60 poster presentations and 2 plenary sessions. The presentations covered various sub-themes ranging from outbreak investigations, case management, health system strengthening, vaccine preventable diseases, communicable diseases and surveillance. The conference featured a National Night and climaxed with awards to outstanding presenters.

Country: NIGERIA

Dates: 05 Jul 17 - 07 Jul 17

Venue: Transcorp Hilton Hotel

Organizers: Nigeria Centre for Disease Control / Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme

Secretariat: gchinyere@afenet.net

Contact person: Dr Patrick Nguku (pnguku@afenet.net)