Proceedings of Nigeria Centre for Disease Control/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2nd Annual Scientific Conference (Abuja, 2018)

Opening ceremony

Effect of health education on perception and uptake of cervical cancer screening services among female healthcare workers in Osun State

Cite this: Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. Apr 2018; 8(8): 85. doi:10.11604/pamj.cp.2018.8.85.667

Submitted: 19 Jan 18   Accepted: 26 Jan 18   Published: 09 Apr 18

Key words: Cervical cancer, screening, health-care workers, health education

© Dorcas Adeola Aderinwale et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Available online at: http://www.proceedings.panafrican-med-journal.com/conferences/2018/8/85/abstract

Corresponding author: Dorcas Adeola Aderinwale, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria (aderinwaleadeola@ymail.com)

This abstract is published as part of the proceedings of Nigeria Centre for Disease Control/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2nd Annual Scientific Conference(NIGERIA, )

Effect of health education on perception and uptake of cervical cancer screening services among female healthcare workers in Osun State

Dorcas Adeola Aderinwale1,&, Adedeji Onayade2, Abdullahi Musa3

 

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Abuja, Nigeria, 2Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, 3African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET), Nigeria

 

 

&Corresponding author
Dorcas Adeola Aderinwale, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria

 

 

Abstract

Introduction: cervical cancer is the leading genital tract malignancy and cause of cancer deaths among women in developing countries. A lack of effective screening programme aimed at detecting and treating precancerous condition is a key reason for the much higher incidence of cervical cancer in developing countries. This study was done to determine non- utilization of cervical cancer screening services among female health care workers.

 

Methods: this study was interventional employing quantitative and qualitative methods; intervention consisted of structured health education. Multistage sampling technique was used to select two LGAs; Atakumosa West and Orolu (Intervention and Control groups respectively). A sample size of 100 per group was estimated; expected prevalence of uptake of cervical cancer screening services of 19.3%, prevalence of uptake of cervical screening from a previous study of 4.3%, a standard normal deviate of 1.96, a margin of error of 5% and an attrition rate of 10%. Data were collected using pre-tested, semi- structured self-administered questionnaires and FGD guides. Data was analyzed using the SPSS version 22 for univariate and bivariate analysis. Level of significance was p < 0.05.

 

Results: post-intervention, there was statistically significant increase in the awareness of cervical cancer and screening in the intervention group (χ2 = 33.06, P < 0.001) while good knowledge of cervical cancer and screening also increased significantly (84.4%) compared to the baseline in the intervention group (p < 0.001) without significant change in the control group. Positive attitude towards cervical cancer screening was higher in the intervention group (76.7%) compared with the control group (53.9%) (p = 0.001) which was similar pre-intervention (48% and 41% respectively). There was however, no significant change in the utilization of cervical cancer screening services pre and post intervention in the intervention group (14% and 18%) and control group (12.4% and 16%). FGD findings on the main reason for non-utilization of cervical cancer screening services among the study and control groups is lack of awareness of the location for the screening and cost of the services.

 

Conclusion: health education is effective in improving knowledge and achieving positive attitude to cervical cancer screening services among female health care workers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nigeria CDC/Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme 2<sup>nd</sup> Annual Scientific Conference (Abuja)

To create a platform for epidemiologists and public health physicians to share their scientific works, NCDC/NFELTP organized the 2nd annual scientific conference with the theme "strengthening one health through field epidemiology training" at Transcorp Hilton Hotel, Abuja, Nigeria from July 5-7, 2017. The objectives of the conference were to provide residents and graduates a forum to share findings from their field activities; provide training opportunity for trainees on scientific communication; provide an opportunity for epidemiological networking as well as create a forum to discuss pertinent public health issues. In attendance were dignitaries from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USAID, WHO, Africa CDC, Ministries Departments and Agencies, University officials and other implementing partners. With the current rise in zoonotic diseases, the conference also featured a two-day pre-conference workshop on One Health which prioritized zoonotic infectious diseases in Nigeria using standardized prioritization methods. A second workshop focused on antimicrobial resistance. There were 38 oral presentations, 60 poster presentations and 2 plenary sessions. The presentations covered various sub-themes ranging from outbreak investigations, case management, health system strengthening, vaccine preventable diseases, communicable diseases and surveillance. The conference featured a National Night and climaxed with awards to outstanding presenters.

Country: NIGERIA

Dates: 05 Jul 17 - 07 Jul 17

Venue: Transcorp Hilton Hotel

Organizers: Nigeria Centre for Disease Control / Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme

Secretariat: gchinyere@afenet.net

Contact person: Dr Patrick Nguku (pnguku@afenet.net)