Conference abstract

Determinants of HIV Risk behaviors among seafarers in Port Harcourt Seaport, Rivers State, Nigeria, 2016

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2018:8(14).21 Dec 2018.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2018.8.14.596

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Keywords: HIV risk behaviors, seafarers, Port Harcourt Port, Nigeria
Opening ceremony

Determinants of HIV Risk behaviors among seafarers in Port Harcourt Seaport, Rivers State, Nigeria, 2016

Ibitein Ngowari Okeafor1,&, Suleiman Idris2, Nasir Sani-Gwarzo3, Patrick Nguku1, Chukwuma Okeafor4

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Abuja, Nigeria, 2Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria, 3Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria, 4Department of Mental Health, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State, Nigeria

&Corresponding author
Ibitein Ngowari Okeafor, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction: HIV/AIDS in seafaring is a global health issue with adverse effects on the seafarers and the economy at large. Rivers State has the highest number of seaports and reports as the state with the highest HIV prevalence rate of 15.2% in Nigeria. This study aimed to identify determinants of HIV risk behaviors among seafarers in Port Harcourt Seaport, Rivers State.

Methods: a cross sectional study was carried out from March to May 2016 among seafarers in Port Harcourt Seaport. Data on socio-demographic characteristics, seafaring related characteristics, HIV knowledge, attitude, and risk behaviors were collected using a validated, pre-tested and self-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using Epi Info version 7.

Results: the mean age standard deviation of the seafarers was 38.8 8.51 years. Majority of the seafarers were males (92.2%, n = 95). The prevalence of multiple sex partnership was 29.1% (n = 30); transactional sex was 6.8% (n = 7); homosexuality was 1.0% (n = 1) and illicit intra-venous drug use was 2.9% (n = 3). Thirty-five of the seafarers (34.0%) engaged in one or more HIV risk behaviors. Multivariate analysis revealed that seafarers who spent six or more months on voyage were three times more likely to engage in HIV risk behaviors than those who spent less than six months [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.08; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.26 - 7.51; p < 0.05]. Also, seafarers with no comprehensive HIV knowledge were 2.5 times more likely to engage in HIV risk behaviors than those with comprehensive HIV knowledge (AOR = 2.49; 95% CI = 1.03 - 5.96; p < 0.05).

Conclusion: long duration of voyage and lack of comprehensive knowledge on HIV are determinants of HIV risk behaviors among seafarers in this study. Regular HIV sensitization visits to seafarers are advocated to promote HIV knowledge and discourage HIV risk behaviors among this highly mobile population.