Conference abstract

HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among blood donors in Koforidua, 2016

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2017:3(34).17 Dec 2017.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2017.3.34.153

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Keywords: HIV, HBV, HCV, syphilis infections, co-infections
Oral presentation

HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among blood donors in Koforidua, 2016

Alomatu Holy1,&, Bismark Sarfo2, Donne Kofi Ameme1, Edwin Andrew Afari1, Kofi Mensah Nyarko3, Samuel Oko Sackey1, Fred Wurapa1

1Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Ghana, 2University of Ghana School of Public Health, Ghana, 3Namibia FELTP, Namibia

&Corresponding author
Alomatu Holy, Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Ghana

Abstract

Introduction: HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections are common transfusion transmissible infections that require mandatory screening among blood donors. These infections among blood donors are of public health concern because of their prolonged viraemia. This study determined the prevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis infections; co-infections; and the associated factors among blood donors in Koforidua.

Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted at St Joseph hospital and the Regional Hospital in Koforidua. Blood donors were recruited and interviewed. Socio-demographic and behavioral factors of the blood donors were obtained after which 5ml of blood was drawn from each of them. The blood was tested for the infections using rapid test kits. Data was analyzed and categorical variables were presented as percentages. Bivariate analysis was done to determine associations and logistic regressions to identify significant variables.

Results: a total of 426 blood donors were recruited. Majority (85.7%) were males. 59.1% had secondary education. The study found a 4.5% prevalence of HIV, 13.2% prevalence of HBV, 8.0% prevalence of HCV and a 15.3% prevalence of syphilis among blood donors in Koforidua. In total, 36.2% had at least one infection. Total co-infections were 2.4% and HBV- syphilis co infection was the most common, at 1.2%. Socio-demographic and behavioral factors found to be significantly associated with HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis infections among blood donors in Koforidua were residence of the donor, religion, educational level, occupation, category of donor, sex and alcohol use (p < 0.05). The commonest co-infections among blood donors in Koforidua was found to be HBV- syphilis which had a 1.2% prevalence.

Conclusion: the prevalence of HIV among blood donors in Koforidua was 4.47%. Hepatitis B and C prevalence were found to be 13.8% and 8.0% respectively among blood donors while syphilis prevalence was 15.29%. Prevalence of co-infections was 2.4% among blood donors in Koforidua and 36.2% of the donors had at least one of the infections.