Conference abstract

Prevalence of meningitis cases in Katima Mulilo district, Zambezi Region, Namibia, 2007-2015

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2017:3(96).29 Dec 2017.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2017.3.96.215

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Keywords: Katima Mulilo, meningitis, cases, Namibia
Oral presentation

Prevalence of meningitis cases in Katima Mulilo district, Zambezi Region, Namibia, 2007-2015

Annety Likando1, Kofi Nyarko1,&

1Namibia Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Windhoek, Namibia

&Corresponding author
Kofi Nyarko, Namibia Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Windhoek, Namibia

Abstract

Introduction: meningitis is a rare but serious condition that causes the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord known as the meninges to swell. It is usually caused by an infection of the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. The common organism that causes meningitis are: Neisseria meningitides, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Cryptococcus neoformas, Mycobacterial tuberculosis, Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenza. Meningitis can cause permanent disability. Katima Mulilo is Meningitis endemic. We described the trend of Meningitis cases in Katima Mulilo, Namibia, from 2007 and 2015, identified the common causative organism and determined the case fatality rate.

Methods: we conducted a descriptive retrospective study in June 2016. We reviewed medical records on meningitis from 2007 to 2015. A line list was created from the case investigation forms. We identified confirmed and suspected cases. We analyzed the trends using Excel and Epi-info, we analyzed variables such as sex, outcome status, address, age, classification and date of onset.

Results: a total of 112 meningitis cases were reported between 2007 and 2015 in Katima Mulilo district, out of which 21 (18.7%) death were reported, giving a case fatality rate of 19%. The cases showed a seasonality trend of high peak around the month of September. Cryptococcus neoformas was the major causative organism. Although the highest number of the cases (29) were reported in 2013, the highest annual mortality of 26% was reported in 2011. The most affected were males (58%) and people in the year group 30-40 years (38%).

Conclusion: cryptococcus neoformas is a common opportunistic infection among HIV patients. There is a need for further studies on the risk factors and on HIV-Meningitis co-morbidity. We recommend health education on risk factors in schools and on the media.