Conference abstract

Mapping of self-reported dog bite victims and spatial clusters of rabies exposure in Ogun State, Nigeria, 2013-2017: a CCPZ perspective for more effective one-health surveillance

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2019:10(20).29 Dec 2019.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2019.10.20.851

Contact the corresponding author
Keywords: Dog-human interface, geographic distribution, rabies exposure, rural, urban
Oral presentation

Mapping of self-reported dog bite victims and spatial clusters of rabies exposure in Ogun State, Nigeria, 2013-2017: a CCPZ perspective for more effective one-health surveillance

Charles Amakoh1,&, Philip Mshelbwala1, Ogechi Njoku1, Olufunmilayo Adegbite2, Oluyomi Bamiselu3, Irene Esu2, Ismaila Shinkafi2, Bola Adeyemi2, Aisha Onatunde4, Emmanuel Akeba4, Sophie Druelles5, Sophie Druelles1,2, Sophie Druelles4, Ayotunde Fasunla1,4, Oloruntoba Olodun7, Babasola Olugasa1,7, Albert Ogunkoya1,7

1Centre for Control and Prevention of Zoonoses, Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria, 2Federal Ministry of Health, Federal Secretariat, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria, 3Epidemiology Department, Ministry of Health, State Secretariat, Abeokuta, Ogun State, 4Veterinary Services Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria, 5Sanofi Pasteur, Lyon, France, 6Department of Otorhynolaryngology, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, 7Society for Rabies in West Africa, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria

&Corresponding author
Charles Amakoh, Centre for Control and Prevention of Zoonoses, Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction: geographic distribution of dog bite victims is a critical input in assessing the spatial pattern of rabies exposures and formulating logical framework for more effective detection, surveillance and control of the disease at the dog-human interface.The dearth of data establishing the true epidemiological pattern of rabies distribution necessitates mapping of dog bite victims (DBVs) in a southwest state of Nigeria. We developed spatial model of DBVs and human rabies exposure in Ogun State, Nigeria.

Methods: victims residential site name generated from clinic records of human health facilities over a 5-year retrospective period (January 2013 to December 2017) and places of rabies exposure in the primary data were converted to map points using a standard procedure. A total of 303 DBVs presented for rabies exposure treatment in Ogun State were enlisted on ageospatial observation-linked data (RAB-GOLD) profile. Space-time cluster scan of DBVs was computed on space-time permutation model with significance set at 0.05.

Results: three space-time clusters of DBVs (1.04km radius in rural environment; geographic centre at 7.136072N, 3.335114E), (1.02km radius in urban environment; geographic centre at 7.172339N, 3.371367E) and (0.05km radius in rural environment; geographic centre at 6.832203N, N, 3.631914E), respectively were identified with rabies exposures.

Conclusion: preponderance of rabies exposure in urban compared to rural environment may indicate geographic disparity in care-seeking preferences among dog bite victims in Ogun State. This suggests potential under-reporting of victims to public health facilities. There is need for more effective rabies surveillance beyond major hospitals by including indigenous facilities.