Conference abstract

Malaria parasitemia and insecticidal net use among children aged 6-59 months at internally displaced persons camps, Abuja, Nigeria, 2016

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2018:8(23).22 Dec 2018.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2018.8.23.605

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Keywords: Malaria prevalence, internally displaced persons, children, LLIN ownership, LLIN utilization, Nigeria
Opening ceremony

Malaria parasitemia and insecticidal net use among children aged 6-59 months at internally displaced persons camps, Abuja, Nigeria, 2016

Joan Ejembi1,2,&, Olufemi Ajumobi1, Mohammed Ibrahim3, Saad Ahmed4, Adebola Olayinka1,2

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Abuja, Nigeria, 2Department of Medical Microbiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria, 3Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria, 4Department of Histopathology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

&Corresponding author
Joan Ejembi, Department of Medical Microbiology Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction: malaria is the commonest cause of morbidity and mortality among displaced children in malaria endemic countries. Nigeria, an endemic country, is experiencing increase in population of internally displaced persons (IDP) due to insurgency. We determined factors associated with malaria and long lasting-insecticidal net (LLIN) use among children aged 6-59 months (U5) in IDP camps in Abuja.

Methods: we conducted a cross-sectional study of all U5s in the three IDP camps in Abuja from June to September 2016. Information on socio-demographic characteristics, LLIN use and risk factors for malaria was collected using a structured questionnaire. We examined blood samples for malaria parasites using rapid diagnostic test. We defined universal LLIN coverage as minimum of one LLIN to two persons per household. Data were analyzed using chi-square and logistic regression.

Results: we recruited 393 U5s from 242 households. Median age was 36 months (Interquartile range (IQR): 30 months), 51.6% were female and median duration of stay in camp was 24 months (Interquartile range: 8.5 months). Malaria prevalence was 30.5%. LLIN ownership was 76.7%, universal coverage 11.2% and use 89.7%. LLIN use was associated with net hanging (Odds ratio (OR): 55.9; 95% Confidence interval (CI): 18.1 - 172.1), breeding site close to dwellings (OR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1 - 6.6) and LLIN ownership for six months or less (OR: 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2 - 5.6). Malaria parasitemia was associated with non-use of LLIN (OR: 4.1; 95% CI: 2.3 - 7.5), LLIN ownership more than six months (OR: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.1 - 3.3) and holes ≥ 10cm in LLIN (OR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.1 - 5.7). Only non-use of LLIN was independently associated with parasitemia (adjusted OR: 4.0; CI: 4.9 - 7.2).

Conclusion: LLIN factors influence its use and protective effect. Malaria parasitemia was higher among those who owned LLIN for more than six months. We recommend further studies on durability of LLIN in displaced populations.