Conference abstract

Establishing event based surveillance system in Nigeria: a complementary information generating platform for improved public health performance, March, 2016

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2018:8(35).28 Dec 2018.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2018.8.35.617

Contact the corresponding author
Keywords: Event based surveillance system, IDSR, availability, forms of reporting health events, Nigeria
Opening ceremony

Establishing event based surveillance system in Nigeria: a complementary information generating platform for improved public health performance, March, 2016

Rabi Usman1, Lawal Bakare2,&, Mahmood Dalhat1, Austin Dada1, Muhammad Balogun1, Saheed Gidado1, Ifeanyi Okudo3, Patrick Nguku1

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Abuja, Nigeria, 2Epid Alert Informative Initiative, Nigeria, 3World Health Organization, Nigeria

&Corresponding author
Lawal Bakare, Epid Alert Informative Initiative, Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction: event-based surveillance (EBS) is the organized and rapid capture of information about events that constitute potential risk to public health. EBS has the potential to complement the existing Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) and permit rapid assessment and response to public health emergencies in Nigeria. There is paucity of data regarding the status of EBS in Nigeria.

Methods: we conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study to determine the availability and utility of EBS in Nigeria. A total of 23 State epidemiologists and 30 Disease Surveillance Notification Officers (DSNOs) were interviewed using self-administered, semi-structured questionnaires. We obtained data on respondentsí awareness of event based surveillance system, availability and functionality of the system, common methods used for reporting health related events and availability of the minimum requirements for event based system. We computed descriptive statistics for data obtained.

Results: about half, 26 (49%) of the total respondents have heard of event based surveillance system. Of this, only 9 (34.6%) described it correctly. Only 17 (45.9%) of the 36 States (plus FCT), have some forms of event based reporting structure. Common methods used for reporting were phone calls, SMS, DSNOs and community informants. No State reported the use of social media/e-mail to report health related events. Ten (58.8%) of the 17 States with some form of event based reporting system have the minimum requirements for an event based surveillance system.

Conclusion: event-based surveillance system is underutilized in Nigeria. The feasibility and utility of EBS should be assessed for possible optimization and adoption at State and federal levels.