Conference abstract

Knowledge and perception of Zika virus infection and its diagnostic proficiency among physicians in Ekiti State, Nigeria, 2016

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2018:8(59).09 Dec 2018.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2018.8.59.641

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Keywords: Zika virus, knowledge, perception, diagnostic proficiency, Nigeria
Opening ceremony

Knowledge and perception of Zika virus infection and its diagnostic proficiency among physicians in Ekiti State, Nigeria, 2016

John Olujide Ojo1,&, Oluyemi Ogundun1, Mahmood Dalhat2, Aboyowa Edukugho2, Muhammad Balogun2, Adeleye Adeomi3, Olushola Abioye1, Folashade Bamidele1, Paul Ajayi4, Tope Olaniyan4

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Abuja, Nigeria, 2African Field Epidemiology, Network, Nigeria, 3Department of Community Health, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria, 4Department of Community Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria

&Corresponding author
John Olujide Ojo, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction: previous demonstration of Zika virus in humans and the presence of Aedes (Steogmyia) albopictus Aedes (Steogmyia) aegypti mosquitoes implies that Nigeria is at risk of sustained Zika virus transmission. We investigated to determine knowledge, perception and diagnostic proficiency of physicians regarding Zika virus infection in South-Western Nigeria.

Methods: we conducted a cross-sectional study. We used self-administered, semi-structured, pre-tested questionnaires to collect information on awareness, general knowledge, knowledge of diagnostic measures and perception about Zika virus infection from respondents. We selected the participants using multistage sampling technique. We used chi-square test and logistic regression to determine associations.

Results: a total of 62 (26.2%) were females. The mean age ± range was 36.9 ± 4.9 years. Most respondents (230 [97%]) were aware of Zika virus infection; however, only 123 (51.9%) had good knowledge of the disease. Zika virus perception was good among 151 (63.7%) participants. Mean knowledge score was 23.2 ± 3.9 (score range12 - 31) while perception score was 12.9 ± 2.2 (score range 8-18). The respondents’ knowledge about Zika virus was significantly associated with their age (p < 0.001), sex (p = 0.009), years of experience (p = 0.042), medical specialty (p < 0.001) and professional designation (p = 0.002). Participants aged 40 years and above were more likely to have good knowledge [OR (CI): 4.22 (2.01 - 8.98)] compared to those below 40years; and those in public health specialty were more likely to have good knowledge [OR (CI): 4.14 (1.23 - 14.40)] compared to those in internal medicine specialty. Only 55 (23.2%) of the participants had good knowledge of laboratory diagnostic measures.

Conclusion: although the awareness about Zika virus infection was high among the physicians, their knowledge and perception were not correspondingly high and their diagnostic proficiency was also poor. We recommend training doctors regarding Zika virus infection to improve epidemic preparedness.