Conference abstract

Tuberculosis infection control knowledge and practice by health care workers at national tuberculosis and leprosy training center, Zaria, North Western, Nigeria

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2018:8(65).09 Dec 2018.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2018.8.65.647

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Keywords: Tuberculosis, tuberculosis infection control, training, knowledge, practice
Opening ceremony

Tuberculosis infection control knowledge and practice by health care workers at national tuberculosis and leprosy training center, Zaria, North Western, Nigeria

Olusola Hassan Ajayi1,&, Ahmadu Isiyaku2, Muhamad Balogun1, Patrick Nguku1

1Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria, 2National Tuberculosis and Laboratory Training Centre, Zaria, Nigeria

&Corresponding author
Olusola Hassan Ajayi, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme, Asokoro, Abuja, Nigeria

Abstract

Introduction: tuberculosis (TB) is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa, multiplying the risk of transmission in the population and among health care providers. Nigeria was rated the fourth highest Tuberculosis (TB)-burden country in the world and number one in Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Interactions between health care providers and patients with active TB increase the risk of TB infection among Healthcare providers and other patients. This study was carried out to assess the knowledge and practice of health care workers at the National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Training Centre, Zaria, Nigeria on Tuberculosis Infection Control.

Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted between April and May, 2016. Eighty-two health workers across various cadres and units were included in the study. The health workers were selected by simple random sampling. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information. Data was entered into Epi-Info 7, cleaned and analyzed. Those with ≥ 60% score in knowledge and practice questions were considered to have good knowledge and practice. Frequency tables and cross tabulations were generated and a P-value < 0.05 was statistically significant for the study.

Results: a total of 78 health workers participated in the study. The response rate was 95.0%. Sixty-one (78.2%) respondents have ever received training on TBIC. Among those who were trained, 90.2%, 95% CI (79.8%, 96.3%) were found to have good knowledge and 85.3%, 95% CI (73.8, 93.0%) with good practice of TBIC. Eighty-eight percent (88.0%) of those with ≥ 5 years of service had good knowledge and practice. Training was found to have a significant effect on TBIC knowledge, AOR 6.42 and 95% CI (1.78, 23.12) and practice AOR 10.34 (1.82, 58.71). Knowledge of TBIC also had a significant effect on good TBIC practice, AOR 5.15 and 95% CI (1.47, 18.12).

Conclusion: most of the HCWs had good TBIC knowledge and practice, but a significant fraction had never been trained on TBIC. Respondents trained on TBIC were found to be more knowledgeable than those not trained. Similarly, respondents with good TBIC knowledge were more likely to have good TBIC practice compared to those with poor TBIC knowledge.