Conference abstract

Perception and elements relating to cost of diabetes management among patients receiving care at University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2021:11(11).20 Dec 2021.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2021.11.11.901

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Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, direct cost, indirect cost, health-seeking behaviour
Abstract

Perception and elements relating to cost of diabetes management among patients receiving care at University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan

Adetayo Adetunji

1Department of Health Promotion and Education, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

&Corresponding author

INTRODUCTION: the rising prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) continue to be a public health concern with negative health and economic implications. This study was designed to investigate perception and cost of diabetes management among patients receiving care in University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan. METHODS: the study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey which used a purposive sampling technique in selecting 207 consenting respondents at UCH. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: majority (62.3%) were of the notion that drugs prescribed at the hospital were too expensive, 53.1% stated that DM does not make one a burden in the family while 55.6% disagreed that DM management causes occasional absenteeism. The average direct cost was $38. Direct cost of managing DM included the expense of $2.5 on transportation per clinic (79.5%) while 76.3% spent $25 or less on recommended diet per week and $6 per consultation. About 25% of respondents were accompanied to the clinic by someone. The average waiting time was 3.7 hours with 48.8% waiting between 120-240 minutes for care. The average direct cost for respondents with poor health seeking behaviour ($53) was statistically different to that of respondents with good health seeking behaviour ($36). CONCLUSION: respondents were not clear about the social burden of diabetes and effects of the disease on their productivity. Health promotion strategies such as advocacy and training are needed to decrease out of pocket expenditure and waiting time in hospitals.