Conference abstract

Use of the polar H10 cardiofrequencemeter and Ewing´s autonomic function tests in the screening of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus in Yaoundé

Pan African Medical Journal - Conference Proceedings. 2021:11(17).20 Dec 2021.
doi: 10.11604/pamj-cp.2021.11.17.931

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Keywords: Cardiac autonomic neuropathy, cardiofrequencemeter, cardiovascular tests
Oral presentation

Use of the polar H10 cardiofrequencemeter and Ewing´s autonomic function tests in the screening of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in type 1 diabetes mellitus in Yaoundé

Nanseu Minerve Aïcha1,&, Nganou-Gnindjio Chris Nadège2,4, Mesmin Yefou Dehayem3,4, Eugène Sobngwi3,4

1Higher Institute of Health Sciences, Bangangté, Cameroon, 2Department of Cardiology, Yaoundé Central Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon, 3National Obesity Centre, Metabolic and Endocrine Diseases Unit, Yaoundé, Cameroon, 4Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon

&Corresponding author

INTRODUCTION: cardiac autonomic neuropathy is detected by induced changes in heart rate during standardized cardiovascular tests performed in patients, using a cardiofrequencemeter. This procedure can determine the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in type 1 diabetes. METHODS: we conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study at the National Obesity Centre of Yaoundé. 60 young people with type 1 diabetes underwent a physical examination, a resting electrocardiogram and five standardized Ewing and Clarke autonomic function tests (orthostatic hypotension, hand grip test, Valsalva, deep breathing test and stand test) using a Polar H10 cardiofrequencemeter. RESULTS: the study population had a male to female sex ratio of 1.6, a mean age of 19.6 ± 4.3 years, diabetes duration of 5.9 ± 5.1 years, and an HbA1c was 9.1 ± 3.1%. Resting heart rate was 82.9 ± 14.7 bpm. Responses to the five tests were normal, borderline and abnormal. Despite the 91.7% who had an abnormal controlled ventilation test, orthostatic hypotension which is a sign of severity of autonomic cardiac neuropathy, was found in only 1.7% of patients. CONCLUSION: the five Ewing and Clarke tests are replicable in clinical practice with the H10 polar cardiofrequencemeter. The prevalence of autonomic cardiac neuropathy found was 86.7% because it was boosted by the three parasympathetic tests. Thus, developing a single standard and universal consensus for the interpretation of these tests is important for a better screening of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.